The Moon by Night

October 28, 2009 at 7:53 pm (24-Hour Read-a-Thon, Children's lit, Juvanalia, Young adult) (, )

moon by night 2

The Moon by Night by Madeline L'Engle

The Moon by Night by Madeline L’Engle
originally published 1963
Farrar, Straus, & Giroux, 18th printing, 1997
218 pages
Genre: Juvenalia, young adult

Synopsis & Review: It’s been a year, and things are changing for the Austin family. Their Aunt Elena, widowed in Meet the Austins, is marrying their Uncle Douglas, and the two will be adopting Maggie and moving to California. The Austins themselves will be moving back to New York City, so that their father can pursue research. To cushion the blow of leaving their beloved home and pets in Thornhill, Connecticut, the Austins head out on a camping trip across the continent, to California and back. Along the way, they encounter interesting people and the beauties of North America. And Vicky, blossoming after an awkward pre-adolesence, begins attracting attention.

Like a moth to a flame, Zachary Grey follows Vicky across the country, playing Hares and Foxes, despite her parents’ objections. Zack is a troubled young man, living on borrowed time, and he alternately thrills and confuses Vicky. On the way back east, she also meets Andy Ford in Yellowstone, a bright, considerate young man who makes plans to meet up with her in New York. Feeling pressured by her family on one side, and strange young men on the other, Vicky struggles to find her own identity and assert it.

One thing I can hardly bear is to read the first book in a series and not be immediately able to continue it, so when I decided to request Meet the Austins from the Multnomah County Library, I also requested The Moon by Night. Both arrived just in time for Dewey’s Read-a-Thon, and were my fallback un-read YA books. You know, for in case I needed something lighter. And it was a lot lighter a read than Meet the Austins, for me at least. Read the rest of this entry »

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Meet the Austins

October 27, 2009 at 7:41 pm (24-Hour Read-a-Thon, Children's lit, Juvanalia, Young adult) (, )

meet the austins

Meet the Austins by Madeline L'Engle

Meet the Austins by Madeline L’Engle
originally published 1960
Farrar, Straus, & Giroux, 1997
216 pages
Genre: Juvenalia, young adult

Synopsis & Review: The moment Maggy Hamilton steps into the happy lives of the Austin family, she disrupts their harmonious world, bringing with her all the sullenness and insolence of her own misery.

Vicky Austin knows she should sympathize with Maggy for being an orphan, but she can’t help but resent her for making life so difficult. It looks like Maggy may be a member of the family for a long time, possibly forever. Vicky remembers the happy times and finally accepts that things will never be the same, but she wonders what’s to come. (cover blurb)

The Austin family–Mother, Father, John, Vicky, Suzy, and Rob, plus innumerable cats and two dogs–live in a rambling old farmhouse on a windy Connecticut hill, a mile or two off the main road. They are a close, literate family, with great consideration for one another (sound familiar?), and live a pleasant, comfortable life. And then one night the phone rings, and their close family friend Uncle Hal is dead. In the wake of his death as a test pilot, his partner’s motherless little girl, Maggie comes to stay with the Austins, bringing a discordant note into their harmonious lives. Maggie is spoiled, selfish, loud, and attention-seeking, everything the Austin parents try to teach their offspring not to be.

How did I miss these books? I loved A Wrinkle in Time, and read several of the sequels, so how did I manage to never encounter the Austins? Perhaps it stemmed from my diffident reading of An Acceptable Time, a book I had a hard time giving a crap about (though I still own it) and was highly disappointed by. Polly just never did it for me the way the older generation of Murrays did, I guess. Despite my disappointment at not growing up with the Austins, I am delighted to have discovered them at this late date. Read the rest of this entry »

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